fastcompany
fastcompany:

If you don’t want to slam the brakes on your next brainstorming session, avoid these idea-killing phrases.
Ideas are fragile—they’re easily shattered by snubs, smirks, and scorn. And brainstorms are equally delicate. The wrong words at the wrong time bring brainstorming to a screeching halt.
The function of brainstorming has received its share of badmouthing in recent years, often for good cause. And many of those problems stem from statements made before or during brainstorming sessions.
For healthy brainstorming and bountiful ideas, always steer clear of these seven sentences:
Read More>

fastcompany:

If you don’t want to slam the brakes on your next brainstorming session, avoid these idea-killing phrases.

Ideas are fragile—they’re easily shattered by snubs, smirks, and scorn. And brainstorms are equally delicate. The wrong words at the wrong time bring brainstorming to a screeching halt.

The function of brainstorming has received its share of badmouthing in recent years, often for good cause. And many of those problems stem from statements made before or during brainstorming sessions.

For healthy brainstorming and bountiful ideas, always steer clear of these seven sentences:

Read More>

fastcompany
fastcompany:

I have a lot of ideas in my head. And for the most part, that’s where they used to stay.
In my head. Where other people couldn’t see them, interact with them or build upon them. Where they were safe and untested and uncriticized. All mine.
Sure, I’ve created some. Some might say I’ve created plenty. But that’s only because they can’t see what I’m not creating. For example, this very post sat dormant for at least a month while I pondered, waited and nitpicked at it.
Because the riskiest, most dangerous and potentially most interesting ideas are the easiest to hold back. I would pin them down like butterflies on a mat, like art at a museum. They were in spreadsheets, in notebooks, on scrap paper around my desk.
And while it might feel creative to think of these ideas, they were dying a lonely death when I wasn’t doing anything with them. They didn’t get their chance to add anything to the world. To affect someone. To spark something.
I lost out, too, with this arrangement. I didn’t push myself to think deeper and harder. I lost out on the feedback or insight or even criticism of others. I missed the chance to discover uncharted territory within myself. I stopped before I could start.
It wasn’t the best life I could give my ideas—or myself.
So I decided to change. To find a way forward, I cataloged all the things that had ever stopped me from creating so I could shoot them down, one-by-one. It turned out to be a helpful exercise, so I thought I’d share. 
Do any of these reasons for not creating something sound familiar to you?
Read More>

fastcompany:

I have a lot of ideas in my head. And for the most part, that’s where they used to stay.

In my head. Where other people couldn’t see them, interact with them or build upon them. Where they were safe and untested and uncriticized. All mine.

Sure, I’ve created some. Some might say I’ve created plenty. But that’s only because they can’t see what I’m not creating. For example, this very post sat dormant for at least a month while I pondered, waited and nitpicked at it.

Because the riskiest, most dangerous and potentially most interesting ideas are the easiest to hold back. I would pin them down like butterflies on a mat, like art at a museum. They were in spreadsheets, in notebooks, on scrap paper around my desk.

And while it might feel creative to think of these ideas, they were dying a lonely death when I wasn’t doing anything with them. They didn’t get their chance to add anything to the world. To affect someone. To spark something.

I lost out, too, with this arrangement. I didn’t push myself to think deeper and harder. I lost out on the feedback or insight or even criticism of others. I missed the chance to discover uncharted territory within myself. I stopped before I could start.

It wasn’t the best life I could give my ideas—or myself.

So I decided to change. To find a way forward, I cataloged all the things that had ever stopped me from creating so I could shoot them down, one-by-one. It turned out to be a helpful exercise, so I thought I’d share.

Do any of these reasons for not creating something sound familiar to you?

Read More>

fastcompany
fastcompany:

Yeah. We know. To get to great ideas, you have to create a culture that values them.
But you can have the best culture in the world and your people aren’t going to spontaneously combust into fireballs of Da Vinci-level inspiration. You’ve got to work at it.
And, frankly, much of that work isn’t terribly difficult, although some of it is counterintuitive. If you’re ready to harness the power of great ideas in your organization, try these tips.
Read More>

fastcompany:

Yeah. We know. To get to great ideas, you have to create a culture that values them.

But you can have the best culture in the world and your people aren’t going to spontaneously combust into fireballs of Da Vinci-level inspiration. You’ve got to work at it.

And, frankly, much of that work isn’t terribly difficult, although some of it is counterintuitive. If you’re ready to harness the power of great ideas in your organization, try these tips.

Read More>

jacobwren

ARTISTS AGAINST ADMIN. ( AAA ).

A Manifesto

We the undersigned believe in the power of action. We believe in the present not the future. We believe that constantly thinking about the future changes the nature of our present action and will no longer deal in future tenses.
We will delete all requests for plans, plots and deals.
We will filter out all demands for a bureaucratically filled package of work.
We resist all contractual contras and petty form filling.
We abhor the mission statement and the tag line.
We dismiss all notions of quantification.

We hereby declare and restate our intent on action and action only.
From this moment our only intention is : to think about and make work.

We demand honest conversations, quick decisions,economical organisation and cheap publicity.
We demand simple applications, straightforward dialogue and templates for all.
We demand fast payment for work and transparency for fees.
We demand a streamlined system.
We demand spontaneity and life.

No to target audiences.
No to contractual contras.
No to slow responses from promoters.
No to idiotic emails.
No to the proliferation of management and marketing.
No to admin.

WHAT DO WE WANT ? TO LIVE IN THE PRESENT.
WHEN DO WE WANT IT? NOW.

Wendy Houstoun (via jacobwren)
fastcompany
fastcompany:

As Stephen Colbert or any great satirist will tell you, a key to satire is to always stay in character. In The Onion’s case, that “character” is an absurd, alternative world invented to comment on the real one. Every aspect of the fake world has to ring true for the trick to work. That includes the visuals. When nothing you publish is real, every single image has to be made from scratch. “We want to make sure that we’re making our Onion-world fully realized and very real,” says Ben Berkley, managing editor of The Onion. It’s all in service of the joke.
Read More>

fastcompany:

As Stephen Colbert or any great satirist will tell you, a key to satire is to always stay in character. In The Onion’s case, that “character” is an absurd, alternative world invented to comment on the real one. Every aspect of the fake world has to ring true for the trick to work. That includes the visuals. When nothing you publish is real, every single image has to be made from scratch. “We want to make sure that we’re making our Onion-world fully realized and very real,” says Ben Berkley, managing editor of The Onion. It’s all in service of the joke.

Read More>

chuckgroenink

Anonymous asked:

Do you think you could share your process on coloring & compositing separate images in Photoshop? I can do each process on its own well enough, but when I try to do them together I get pretty lost. I'd really appreciate it!

chuckgroenink answered:

Here’s a longish post in which I go into my process. It’s a bit old, but the technique is basically still the same.

http://chuckgroenink.tumblr.com/post/35522740506/every-now-and-then-people-ask-me-about-my-process

chuckgroenink

chuckgroenink:

chuckgroenink:

Every now and then people ask me about my process, how I colour things in or achieve certain textures. I always mean to answer these questions, but it’s kind of complicated and it would be a bit time consuming.
So here instead are some pictures to do that job. A caveat here is that I rarely work the same way twice and every job is generally an experiment in figuring out new ways to work. But lately quite often my process is something like this.

Step one is to start on paper with ink or gouache. I scan that in and through some photoshop magic (selecting black and white channels and copying to layers) turn every piece into layers. These are actually all things I still happened to have on file. For my last book I made a little data base of rocks, trees and branches to use wherever I needed something. Think of it as a form of collage.

I very quickly put these things together for this demo. Then put every layer on a transparency lock (it’s in the layer window). The next step is basically just messing around with colours. I have a pretty large collection of custom brushes made from various ink and paint washes and splashes. You can basically just use those as rubber stamps to add colours and textures to your layers. This is where the transparency lock comes in handy, as you don’t need to select anything.
Finally I mess around with some adjustment layers to see if something interesting will happen to the colours I hadn’t planned on.
And that’s basically it.

I got some questions about my colouring process lately, so I thought I’d reblog this. It’s a bit old, but I still work pretty much the same way for a lot of projects. Sometimes I draw directly in photoshop and use those custom brushes to layer colours and textures on shapes, or I make something predominantly with pencils. In which case I either use a transparency lock on the linework and colour it in that way. Or it barely needs any work.
Which frankly, seems like a better and better idea the longer I’m working on my current mess of bits of scanned in gouache and ink washes.